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Creating a bedtime routine for better sleep

One of the most common symptoms of menopause is lack of sleep. One way you can get a better sleep is to have a better bedtime routine.

Creating a bedtime routine for better sleep min

I've talked about several ways to get a better sleep before.  Now, let's focus on your bedtime routine. These ideas are just suggestions that you can use or ignore. The important thing is to come up with a routine that works for you.

Why do you need a bedtime routine?

A good bedtime routine will help you fall asleep better and get a better sleep. They can help you feel less stressed, which of course will help you sleep better. A bedtime routine can even help you to be more productive.

Start to think about nights that you sleep well and nights that you don’t. Do you see any patterns emerging?

Start winding down early

If you spend your evening doing things that require a lot of energy, or are stressful you likely can’t fall asleep quickly. Some down time is usually needed before falling asleep. How much downtime is needed varies from person to person. I find if I am out in the evening, I usually need at least an hour before I can fall asleep. I like to keep my evenings quiet most nights.

Evening meditation

Some people find that even a few minutes spent meditating before bed helps with sleep. There are many meditation apps available that have meditations specific to sleep.

You may also find that once you are proficient with meditation, you can use the techniques to help you fall asleep or to fall back asleep if you wake up.

Read a book

Reading a book is a quiet activity that can help to promote restfulness. Reading distracts you from your racing thoughts and slows the mind. It takes you away from the things might be causing you to stay awake. A study done by the University of Wessex found that reading was better at reducing stress levels than walking or listening to music.

To do list

If you tend to lie in bed thinking of everything you need to do tomorrow, then spending some time reviewing your to do list might help with sleep. Putting an item on your to do list is a way of moving that item from the “lets worry about this” list to the “lets do this” list. It lets you feel like you don’t need to think about it until tomorrow.

Another advantage of the to do list is that it lets you see the scope of all that you need to do. Often its not as bad as it looks when you have all of the things doing through your mind at 3 in the morning.

Electronic devices

You have probably heard that you should put away all electronic devices before bed. That is definitely a good habit to get into. But it is not something that I do. I like to use my phone or iPad to read in bed, so I do use my phone in bed.

Using the night time mode which reduces blue light helps some, but it might not be enough for everyone. You can try for a while not using your phone for an hour before bed and see how if it helps your sleep.

Journalling

Many women find that journalling is a good way to finish their day. Journalling helps to clarify your feelings, especially about negative events. It can be a good way to wrap up your day.

Conclusion

I’ve found as I get older that having a bedtime routine is more important. I don’t do everything I’ve suggested, but I wanted you to be aware of some ideas to help you develop your night time routine.

 

https://www.nosleeplessnights.com/sleep-hygiene/bedtime-routine-for-adults/
https://www.sleep.org/articles/design-perfect-bedtime-routine/
https://thriveglobal.com/stories/you-absolutely-need-a-bedtime-routine/
https://www.dreams.co.uk/sleep-matters-club/what-does-reading-before-bed-do-to-an-adults-brain/
https://www.verywellmind.com/the-benefits-of-journaling-for-stress-management-3144611

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